Thousands left in the dark Friday

IN A SNAP A snapped utility pole on Wellington’s Main St. was just one of over 100 that went down in the province of Ontario thanks to heavy winds Friday morning. (Karen Marquardt for the Gazette)
JASON PARKS

STAFF WRITER

It was a start to the month of November very few County residents will forget for some time.

High winds on Thursday night and early Friday morning left some 6,000 homes without power in Prince Edward County as trees toppled powerlines and debris played havoc with restoration efforts across the community. The villages of Wellington, Bloomfield, Cherry Valley and Carrying Place were extremely hard hit as was parts of Sophiasburgh ward.

While many customers in Prince Edward County only needed to survive a few hours without electricity, there were pockets without power until Saturday afternoon.

Tiziana Baccega Rosa, Sr. Media Relations Advisor with Hydro One said repair priorities, while they can be frustrating for customers at the ends of lines or in certain pockets, are made by way of what actions can restore the most customers at one time.

“When we have events like this, we address the main line and take on the repairs that will bring the most people back online,” Rosa told the Gazette.

Friday’s damage was caused by sustained heavy winds that snapped 125 poles across the province and felled countless limbs and trees onto active lines. In total, in this part of the province, there was an outage period Friday morning where 250,000 people were without power.

In mass outage events such as this, Rosa encouraged all affected customers to call Hydro One and report outages. Despite their monikers, smart meters can’t tell grid observer that power has gone out.

“The grid system can’t tell us if the power is out, it’s very important customers call and report their outrage,” Rosa said. “We staff up for these events at our call centre as well as having self serve options on our phone menu.”